Library

Cats + Parasites

  • Ear Mites in Cats and Dogs

    El ácaro del oído Otodectes cynotis es un ácaro de superficie que vive sobre los gatos, perros, conejos y hurones. Normalmente se encuentra en el canal auditivo, pero también puede vivir en otras superficies de la piel. Todo el ciclo vital del ácaro tiene lugar en el animal. Los ácaros del oído son muy contagiosos, y los gatos pueden llegar a infectarse por el contacto directo de otro animal infectado. El ácaro es apenas visible directamente y se identifica como pequeñas motas de polvo blanco sobre un fondo oscuro.

  • Atovaquone is given by mouth and is used off-label to treat protozoal infections. Give as directed. Side effects are uncommon but may include stomach upset or skin rash. Do not use in pets that are pregnant. If a negative reaction occurs, contact your veterinarian as soon as possible.

  • Azithromycin is given by mouth or injection and is used on and off-label to treat a variety of infections. Give as directed. Common side effects include stomach upset. Do not use in pets that are sensitive to macrolide antibiotics. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Capillaria is a small internal parasite, often less than half of a centimeter in length. They are closely related to intestinal worms, though they can live in a variety of locations within the body. Capillaria can affect both dogs and cats, although dogs are more frequently affected. Diagnosis can be difficult because the eggs of Capillaria are shed only on an intermittent basis. While the parasite is easily eliminated with a dewormer, your cat may require additional medications to decrease the inflammation associated with the infection.

  • Coccidiosis is an intestinal tract infection caused by a one-celled organism or protozoa called coccidia. Coccidia are microscopic parasites that live within the cells that line the intestine. Many cats that are infected with coccidia do not have diarrhea or any other clinical signs. When the oocysts are found in the stool of a cat without diarrhea, they are generally considered a transient, insignificant finding. However, in kittens and debilitated adult cats, coccidiosis can cause severe, watery diarrhea, dehydration, abdominal distress, and vomiting. Kittens are commonly diagnosed with coccidiosis. The most common drug used to treat coccidiosis is a sulfa-class antibiotic, sulfadimethoxine. Cats are frequently reinfected from the environment, so disinfection is important.

  • Flea Control in Cats

    La pulga más común en el gato y en el perro es la pulga del gato (Ctenocephalides felis), aunque en los gatos también podemos encontrar otro tipo de pulgas como las pulgas de los conejos, ardillas y otro tipo de fauna salvaje.

  • Cuterebra is the genus or scientific family name of the North American rabbit or rodent botfly. Twenty-six species of Cuterebra are known to occur in the United States and Canada. Cuterebra larvae develop within the tissues of certain animal hosts, and during this phase of their life cycle, they are commonly referred to as 'warbles'.

  • Cytauxzoonosis is an often-fatal disease caused by a tick-borne protozoan parasite, typically found in bobcats. It is more commonly seen in the southern United States but is spreading with tick migration. It can cause anorexia, lethargy, respiratory difficulty, anemia, and jaundice. Diagnostic testing, treatment options, and preventives are described in this handout. This disease is not transmissible to dogs or humans.

  • Miliary Dermatitis in Cats

    La dermatitis miliar es un término general usado para describir una condición cutánea en los gatos que normalmente suele ser consecuencia de una reacción alérgica. Debido a que la mayoría de las dermatitis alérgicas o reacciones de la piel en los gatos son provocadas por una alergia a las pulgas, los dos términos han llegado a ser sinónimos.

  • The ear mite is a surface mite that lives on cats, dogs, rabbits, and ferrets. It is usually found in the ear canal but it can also live on the skin surface. Mites are barely visible to the naked eye. Clinical signs of infestation vary in severity and may include ear irritation, leading to scratching at the ears or head shaking, dark waxy or crusty discharge from the ear, areas of hair loss resulting from self-trauma, a crusted rash around or in the ear, and an aural hematoma. Your veterinarian will advise you about which insecticidal products are suitable. Your veterinarian may want to re-examine your pet to ensure that the mites have been eliminated after the initial treatment has been performed.



Appointments


We are happy to book an appointment for you! Give us a call at 724-941-4366 or fill out our online form.





Our Services


We strive to provide complete care for our patients. Learn more about all the services we offer.





Pet Health Library


We are committed to providing you with the latest in pet health information. Take a look at our Pet Health Library today.