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Breeding

  • Although the majority of dogs will give birth without the need for human or veterinary assistance, certain problems can arise which require veterinary attention. It is important to closely monitor your pet during birthing and seek veterinary care if you have any concerns. If intense contractions have been occurring for twenty to thirty minutes without a puppy being born, it is important to contact your veterinarian.

  • Pregnancy in dogs, also called the gestation period, normally ranges from 57-65 days with an average of 63 days. It is important that she be in good physical condition before she is mated. During the last three weeks of pregnancy, your dog's food intake should increase by up to one and a half times the normal level, by feeding smaller meals more frequently.

  • Breeding dogs is a great responsibility that should not be done just because an owner wants puppies from their beloved dog. There are many potential consequences to the bitch and the puppies that need to be taken into account and prevented if possible, including producing puppies from parents with known heritable problems and medical care of the bitch and puppies. Breeding does not reduce unwanted behavior in male dogs and there is no guarantee that puppies will be anything like the parent, so this is not valid reasons to breed a dog. Many puppies are abandoned at dog shelters or worse because of inappropriate breeding practices. There are usually many abandoned dogs looking for homes that an owner can find what they are looking for through shelters or rescue organizations.

  • During the last week of pregnancy, the female often starts to look for a safe place for whelping. Some pets appear to become confused, wanting to be with their owners and at the same time wanting to prepare their nest. It is a good idea to get your pet used to the place where you want her to have her puppies well in advance of whelping. Some dogs like the owner to be with them the whole time they are in labor. Others prefer to have their puppies in seclusion.

  • A sheepdog from France? With his long shaggy locks, curiously perked ears and air of dignified aloofness, the Briard is indeed a French sheepdog with that je ne sais quois - not like his British or German sheepherding brothers, but entirely original.

  • These dogs are playful and happy to join their family in anything. Most are friendly and accepting of strangers. They're happy, waggy dogs who always greet their family with an invitation to play.

  • They're perfectly willing to lie beside you (or on your lap) while you're reading a book, but if you invite them to play, they'll join a rousing game of catch-me-if-you-can.

  • The clownish, energetic Bull Terrier has found himself to be the object of advertising adoration. No fewer than three Bull Terriers have lent their talents to various marketing media. That said, any well-bred Bull Terrier is happy to put on a show for the family upon whom he lavishes never-ending devotion – and for family guests as well.

  • With its massive head, jutting jaw and barrel shape, the Bulldog appears to be a real tough guy but in fact is just the opposite. The truth is, everyone loves the Bulldog and this sweetheart returns the compliment.

  • Strong-willed and with a body more powerful than the average bear, the Bullmastiff cannot be coerced to do something he doesn't want to do. But for a master he loves and respects, nothing is impossible. These dogs crave physical contact and consider themselves to be lapdogs despite their girth.



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