Library

Cats + Parasites

  • Imidocarb dipropionate is an injectable medication that is administered by a veterinarian to treat babesiosis in dogs. It is also used off-label to treat other protozoal infections in dogs, cats, and horses. Most common side effects include mild drooling, tearing, vomiting, or nasal drip. Do not use in pets with exposure to cholinesterase-inhibiting drugs, pesticides, or chemicals. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • This handout outlines common internal parasites in cats. Included are parasites of the gastrointestinal tract (roundworms, hookworms, and tapeworms), as well as parasites of the circulatory system (heartworms). How each of these parasites can affect your cat and what you can do to prevent or treat infection are explained.

  • Lung flukes in North America are parasites called Paragonimus kellicotti that infect the lungs of cats after they have eaten an infected crayfish or rodents that have eaten infected crayfish. Eggs are then released by the parasite into the cat’s sputum to be coughed out or swallowed and released in the feces to continue the life cycle. Lung flukes can be found anywhere in North America but more commonly around the Mississippi River and Great Lakes. Infected cats can be symptom-free or may develop cough with sometimes bloody mucus, pneumonia, pneumothorax, lethargy and weakness. Diagnosis can include locating eggs of the parasite from feces or mucus from the lungs. X-rays can also reveal cysts in the lungs caused by the parasite. Treatment requires one of 2 commonly used anti-parasitic medications: Praziquantel or Fenbendazole. Although zoonotic, these parasites won’t transmit directly from cats to humans.

  • Metronidazole is given by mouth or injection and is used off-label to treat certain anaerobic bacterial and protozoal infections and gastrointestinal conditions in dogs, cats, and other animals. Give as directed. Side effects may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, regurgitation, decreased appetite, tiredness, and drooling. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it, are debilitated, or are pregnant or nursing. If a negative reaction occurs, contact your veterinarian.

  • Feline miliary dermatitis is a skin condition that typically results from an underlying allergic reaction, most commonly to fleabites. An affected cat will have a very itchy rash and may lick, bite, and scratch at the affected skin, quickly progressing to small lesions with scabs on them. The offending allergen must be removed for long-term resolution.

  • Moxidectin and fluralaner are combined in one topical treatment for use in cats. Moxidectin topical is an avermectin antiparasitic that is used to prevent heartworms and treat intestinal parasites (hookworms and roundworms). Fluralaner is used to treat and prevent fleas and also kills black-legged ticks (deer ticks). Give as directed. Side effects are uncommon but may include hair loss at the application site, itching, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, excessive drooling, and dry skin. Moxidectin + fluralaner should not be used in pets that are hypersensitive or allergic to it. Do not use this medication in sick, debilitated, or underweight cats. Use caution in cats with known neurologic disorders. If you suspect an overdose or an adverse reaction to the medication, call your veterinary office immediately. If they are not available, follow their directions in contacting an emergency facility.

  • Moxidectin is an avermectin antiparasitic that is used to prevent heartworms and treat intestinal parasites. Imidacloprid treats and prevents fleas. These two drugs are combined in one topical product for use in cats, dogs, and ferrets. Use as directed. Side effects are uncommon and usually short-lived, however, if you suspect an overdose or an adverse reaction to the medication, call your veterinary office immediately.

  • The American Animal Hospital Association and American Veterinary Medical Association have established guidelines to standardize preventive health care for cats, helping them to live longer, healthier lives. This handout provides an overview of the recommendations within these guidelines and why they are so important.

  • Adding a new kitten to your family is a lot of fun, but it is also a big responsibility. This handout reviews basic kitten care, including vaccinations, internal and external parasites, nutrition, and nail care. It also reviews the importance of early spay/neuter and microchip identification.

  • Ringworm infections in cats are caused by a fungus, not a worm. They can be easily recognized, though definitive testing by fungal culture is recommended. Ringworm is highly contagious and can be spread between animals and from animals to people. The clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, and risks are explained in this handout.



Appointments


We are happy to book an appointment for you! Give us a call at 724-941-4366 or fill out our online form.





Our Services


We strive to provide complete care for our patients. Learn more about all the services we offer.





Pet Health Library


We are committed to providing you with the latest in pet health information. Take a look at our Pet Health Library today.